Pregnancy lifestyle

Share now:

It is not new that lifestyle changes will be made while pregnant. Read through out wardrobe tips, travel guide, and more, to help make sense of it all.

 

It won’t be news to you that you’re going to need to make some lifestyle changes now that you’re pregnant.

From your clothing, to your conversations, your exercise regime and even your vices – all these changes may sometimes make you feel like a different person altogether.

Some areas of your lifestyle could change more than others. However, being pregnant doesn’t mean you have to sit at home all day and wear tent dresses. It’s perfectly safe to still get out and explore the world around you – in fact you’re encouraged to when you have a “bun in your oven”.

With a few wardrobe tips, some handy fashion equipment and some helpful travel guidelines, you’ll be able to glide through your pregnancy pretty smoothly.

Maternity clothes

By the second trimester, you may start to feel you need maternity clothes as your clothes become tighter. And with so many maternity options, you can look and feel good at every stage.

Choosing maternity clothes and other lifestyle products can be an overwhelming task. Finding pieces that are comfortable, keep you looking your best, and don’t cost you the earth won’t always be easy. This may be especially true if this is your first pregnancy.

Some women find they prefer not to buy maternity clothes. They just buy pants and skirts with an elasticised waist and tops and other clothing in a bigger size. It’s up to you.

We have put together a simple maternity wear guide that covers the five most important maternity wear items and explain how each one can benefit you during pregnancy.

Learn about maternity:

  • Belly bands
  • Bras
  • Evening wear
  • Jeans
  • Swimwear

Travel during pregnancy

From driving your car down the street, to travelling on a plane overseas – there are some hazards that you need to be aware of while you are pregnant.

We have compiled a list of handy tips for some of the most common aspects of travel during pregnancy, including:

  • Travel insurance
  • Travel immunisation
  • Air travel
  • Avoiding blood clots
  • Travel by boat
  • Travel by car
  • Travel on public transport

Travelling while pregnant can be risky, especially travelling overseas. But it’s understandable that you’d want to make the most of any free time you have before your little one arrives.

Consider taking a special holiday with your partner before you give birth – commonly labelled as a “babymoon” – to cherish your time together before two becomes three or more!

Remember, some countries pose more risks than others, and tropical areas in developing countries are best avoided. But flying any distance could also put you and you baby at risk and best avoided after 35 weeks. Research before you book anything. Some airlines won't fly you beyond a certain time, and some travel insurers won't cover you beyond 24 weeks. Some countries require vaccinations, so do your research before you embark on a trip overseas and speak with your maternity care provider for guidance.

Where possible, plan your travel arrangements to allow for frequent breaks. Being able to move around, stretch and easily access a toilet will make the world of difference to your comfort and health.

Sitting still for hours on end will not only be uncomfortable but won’t be good for your own or your baby’s health. At a minimum, remember to get up and walk around every couple of hours while you are pregnant.

As well as movement, staying hydrated is important, especially when travelling. The risk of blood clots increases with dehydration.

Try not to worry too much about the world around you. There’s no need to live in fear or in a bubble. But being aware, mindful and alert will help you to avoid complications. And to enjoy your pregnancy as much as possible.

Check with your maternity care provider to see there is no reason why you can’t travel. Generally, travel in the first and second trimester of pregnancy is safer than in the third.

The information published herein is intended and strictly only for informational, educational, purposes and the same shall not be misconstrued as medical advice. If you are worried about your own health, or your child’s well being, seek immediate medical advice. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website. Kimberly-Clark and/ or its subsidiaries assumes no liability for the interpretation and/or use of the information contained in this article. Further, while due care and caution has been taken to ensure that the content here is free from mistakes or omissions, Kimberly-Clark and/ or its subsidiaries makes no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the information here, and to the extent permitted by law, Kimberly-Clark and/ or its subsidiaries do not accept any liability or responsibility for claims, errors or omissions.

You might like these articles!

Couple In Bed

Is it safe to have sex during pregnancy | Huggies SG

Read More

Metallic taste during early stages of pregnancy

Read More
Distant Husband During Pregnancy

Trouble Getting Pregnant

Read More